Prague is literally a textbook of architecture. Talk a stroll down any given street in this compact capital city and you might find yourself surrounded by centuries of different architectural elements – this is what makes the city of Prague so intriguing for lovers of history and architecture. This myriad of architectural styles in Prague's intact ancient center is what draws millions of visitors each and every year to the golden city. Explore Prague today and see for yourself what the hype is all about, we guarantee these majestic palaces, castles, and houses will not disappoint - for where else can you witness Romanesque, Gothic, Baroque, Art Nouveau, Cubist, Functionalist and Communist Era architecture in one go? Only in Prague – the world's capital of architecture!
 

Romanesque

Romanesque architecture is architecture descended from Roman Times. This type of architecture was the signature style of Europe during the Middle Ages. Inspired by the classical civilizations of antiquity, Romanesque architecture is characterized by wide massive walls, mighty towers, round arches, ornate colonnades, cross vaults and solid piers, an...

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Gothic

Originating in France in the 12th century, awe-inspiring Gothic architecture lasted until the 16th century and then popped up in the 18th through the 20th century England – usually seen in grand churches and university buildings in places such as Oxford and Cambridge. Characteristics of this ornate architectural style include flying buttresses, poi...

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Renaissance

The Renaissance – the celebrated rebirth of art, beauty and culture. The beauty of Renaissance architecture was brought to life by Filippo Brunelleschi and his dome in Florence. Occurring between the early 15th and 17th centuries, the Renaissance style spread quickly across Italian towns to France, Germany and the surrounding areas, and even to Eng...

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Baroque

Born in Italy in the early 17th century and taken from the humanist forms of the architecture of the Renaissance, is the highly decorative Baroque style. This specific architectural style can be distinguished from other types due to its overabundance of gilded everything, especially putti or gilded figures made of wood, large-scale ceiling frescoes...

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Neoclassicism

Neoclassicism, also known as Empire style (which was specifically in the 2nd phase of Neolassicism) was influential in the 18th century after the Napoleonic code captivated France and the people of Europe. Breaking away from the overly ornamental, ornate Rococo architectural style was comparable for some to how Napoleon liberated the European peopl...

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Historicism

Historicism in architecture or art is the regression to the past and the use of such styles in artwork or buildings and structures. This revival of historical and architectural styles is the last phase of Classic architecture. In the architecture of Historicism one finds buildings compiled of many different styles from previous eras, which at times...

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Art Nouveau

Prague is famous for its vast array of architectural styles, with Art Nouveau being one of the more represented styles in this gorgeous European capital. Art Nouveau widely spread throughout the European continent and was evident not only in architectural structures but also in visual arts as well. The designers, artists and architects of the Art N...

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Cubism and Rondocubism

The term Cubism, which was first coined in Paris by art critic Louis Vauxcelles after seeing a strange and startling exhibition by Georges Braque in November of 1908, can be described simply as having elements of geometric schemas and cubes. Cubism went hand in hand with other art movements such as Futurism and Expressionism, but the architectural...

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